KAMBUI OLUJIMI: Rhapsody Refracted

April 20 - May 26, 2018

Aspect/Ratio (864 N Ashland Ave)

 

Aspect/Ratio, in conjunction with Anastasia Tinari Projects, is pleased to present RHAPSODY REFRACTED, the first Chicago solo exhibition for artist Kambui Olujimi. RHAPSODY REFRACTED is a new body of work by Brooklyn native Kambui Olujimi. The exhibition, which includes sculpture, drawing, and a video installation, explores the perpetual interruption and the subsequent refraction of black rhapsody.

The exhibition focuses on the final moments of the 89th Academy Awards in which the presenters failed to announce the movie Moonlight as the winner for the Best Picture Oscar. While the mistake was eventually reconciled on stage and broadcast on international television, the moment of recognition of the film and filmmaker’s historic achievements were marred irrevocably by this unprecedented blunder. This body of work is a proposition of time reconstituted--reimagined and reclaimed from the refracted fragments of stifled elation.

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Kambui Olujimi is a New York based artist and Assistant Professor at Columbia University. His work reflects on mythology, historic narrative, media cultures amongst many themes and is manifested in installation, photography, performance, tapestry, video, large sculpture, works on paper and painting. Olujimi received his MFA from Columbia University and his work has been shown internationally. Recent exhibitions include: Mass MoCA, PS1 MoMA, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Institutional collections include: Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Nasher Museum and The Cleveland Art Museum. 


ATO RIBEIRO: Home Coming

November 3 - December 10, 2017

 

 

Anastasia Tinari Projects is thrilled to present Home Coming, Ato Ribeiro's first U.S. solo exhibition. With extreme precision and craftsmanship, the artist creates intricately detailed, complex patterned “wooden kente cloths” using humble pieces of pine, ebony, ash, maple, walnut, plywood, and other soft and hard woods. Ribeiro pulls inspiration from kente cloth and African-American quilting patterns as a way to bridge his own cultural background growing up between Ghana and the United States, using a personal artistic style that escapes mediation from Western language.

Resourcefulness and using repurposed materials are central to Ato Ribeiro, who recently graduated with an MFA in Printmaking from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Wooden scraps and chips discarded in Cranbrook’s wood shop struck the artist as a material treasure trove that resonated with his upbringing in West Africa, surrounded by rainforest woods and a tradition of woodworking. “I began to see these woods as a metaphor for individual bodies of people of African descent, and how these bodies had been treated or used in Western culture… My goal became to reveal the beauty that I saw in these discarded materials, and to get my audiences to slow down and recognize the same.” Combining woods ranging from pale pine to dark ebony, Ribeiro creates elaborate, geometric, mosaic-like patterns; yet he retains a direct communication with viewers through the material’s familiarity and the quilt-like nature of the large scale works. Site specificity is also central to the artist’s practice. Ribeiro researches the material and physical histories of each particular location where he works: Home Coming incorporate woods collected in Detroit as well as materials from historic Chicago landmarks, sourced from the Rebuild Exchange in Chicago.

Ato Ribeiro (b. 1989, Philadelphia) spent the formative years of his life in Accra, Ghana. He received his BA from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and MFA in Print Media from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Ribeiro has worked in a variety of media, including sculpture, installation, drawing, and print making. His work has been exhibited at the Nubuke Foundation (Accra, Ghana), ABSA Gallery (Johannesburg, South Africa), the Mercedez-Benz Financial Services Headquarters (Farmington Hills, Michigan), The Ink Shop (Ithaca, NY), Agnes Scott Dalton Gallery (Atlanta, Georgia), Crankbrook Art Museum (Bloomfield Hills, Michigan), The Carr Center (Detroit, Michigan), N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art (Detroit, Michigan), Anastasia Tinari Projects (Chicago, IL), and Lisa Sette Gallery (Phoenix, AZ - forthcoming). He was a 2017 Summer Fellow at the Ox-Bow School of Art in Saugatuck, Michigan and a 2017 Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Emerging Artist Award recipient and Artist in Residence at the Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, Germany.

 

 

 

ZACHARY CAHILL: USSA SANCTUARY

September 9 - October 22, 2017

 

Anastasia Tinari Projects is honored to present Zachary Cahill: USSA Sanctuary, the artist’s first solo exhibition in the city since his 2014 show at Museum of Contemporary Art. First formulated in Chicago in 2009, Zachary Cahill’s long-term exhibition-based project “USSA” explores concepts of nation building. USSA posits that art does not have the power to change the worldit is the power to change the world. The USSA has taken the form of an Orphanage, followed by a Gift Shop, Wellness Center, a State Farm, and now a state-church dubbed the Assembly. USSA Sanctuary will present new paintings, sculpture, and a séance performance that will comprise the first full exhibition component of Cahill’s USSA Assembly in Chicago.

USSA Sanctuary is a meditation on repair and rescue through solidarity. Futuristic in its orientation, USSA Sanctuary proposes political possibilities through the valances of abstraction and fantasy. If we live in a world composed of alt-facts and fake news, then it follows that the imagination, the very cogwheels of art itself, is a site for socio-politico contestation. If the old gods are silent, implore new ones to sing. If humanities’ temples are in ruins, build a bright one that shines. If the cosmos is out alignment, draw new trajectories for the stars. If the house of trust has been broken, cast and fire new brick of faith. If the unity has been splintered, assemble. If you do not agree with this world, conjure a new one. Construct a sacred space. Make a sanctuary.

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Zachary Cahill is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist. He has had solo shows at Regina Rex, New York, the KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin, Threewalls, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His work has been included in group exhibitions including: the 8th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art (2014), The Works, Contemporary Art Brussels (2015), and “Broken Flag” Iceberg Projects, Chicago (2016), among others. A widely published author, Cahill's writing has appeared in Afterall, Artforum, The Exhibitionist, Frieze, and MousseArtReview recently profiled Zachary Cahill for its 2017 special issue The Future Greats, a selection of twelve artists from around the world that take on the complexity of the contemporary moment. He is Curator at the University of Chicago's Gray Center.

 

Installation images:

 

 

Automythography: Mequitta Ahuja, Kambui Olujimi, Kaveri Raina, Ato Ribeiro, Alex Yudzon

July 8 - August 30th

 Kambui Olujimi,  2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Kambui Olujimi,  2017. Photo: Tek Chung

 

 

Aspect/Ratio, in conjunction with Anastasia Tinari Projects, is pleased to present RHAPSODY REFRACTED, the first Chicago solo exhibition for artist Kambui Olujimi. RHAPSODY REFRACTED is a new body of work by Brooklyn native Kambui Olujimi. The exhibition, which includes sculpture, drawing, and a video installation, explores the perpetual interruption and the subsequent refraction of black rhapsody.

The exhibition focuses on the final moments of the 89th Academy Awards in which the presenters failed to announce the movie Moonlight as the winner for the Best Picture Oscar. While the mistake was eventually reconciled on stage and broadcast on international television, the moment of recognition of the film and filmmaker’s historic achievements were marred irrevocably by this unprecedented blunder. This body of work is a proposition of time reconstituted--reimagined and reclaimed from the refracted fragments of stifled elation.

--

Kambui Olujimi is a New York based artist and Assistant Professor at Columbia University. His work reflects on mythology, historic narrative, media cultures amongst many themes and is manifested in installation, photography, performance, tapestry, video, large sculpture, works on paper and painting. Olujimi received his MFA from Columbia University and his work has been shown internationally. Recent exhibitions include: Mass MoCA, PS1 MoMA, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Institutional collections include: Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Nasher Museum and The Cleveland Art Museum. 

 Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

 Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung