BENJAMIN LAROSE: Saveur les meubles

Expo Chicago / Chicago Artists Coalition Booth

September 27 - 30, 2018


KAMBUI OLUJIMI: Rhapsody Refracted

April 20 - May 26, 2018

Aspect/Ratio
(864 N Ashland Ave, Chicago, IL)

 

Aspect/Ratio, in conjunction with Anastasia Tinari Projects, is pleased to present RHAPSODY REFRACTED, the first Chicago solo exhibition for artist Kambui Olujimi. RHAPSODY REFRACTED is a new body of work by Brooklyn native Kambui Olujimi. The exhibition, which includes sculpture, drawing, and a video installation, explores the perpetual interruption and the subsequent refraction of black rhapsody.

The exhibition focuses on the final moments of the 89th Academy Awards in which the presenters failed to announce the movie Moonlight as the winner for the Best Picture Oscar. While the mistake was eventually reconciled on stage and broadcast on international television, the moment of recognition of the film and filmmaker’s historic achievements were marred irrevocably by this unprecedented blunder. This body of work is a proposition of time reconstituted--reimagined and reclaimed from the refracted fragments of stifled elation.

--

Kambui Olujimi is a New York based artist and Assistant Professor at Columbia University. His work reflects on mythology, historic narrative, media cultures amongst many themes and is manifested in installation, photography, performance, tapestry, video, large sculpture, works on paper and painting. Olujimi received his MFA from Columbia University and his work has been shown internationally. Recent exhibitions include: Mass MoCA, PS1 MoMA, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Institutional collections include: Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Nasher Museum and The Cleveland Art Museum. 


ATO RIBEIRO: Home Coming

November 3 - December 10, 2017

 

 

Anastasia Tinari Projects is thrilled to present Home Coming, Ato Ribeiro's first U.S. solo exhibition. With extreme precision and craftsmanship, the artist creates intricately detailed, complex patterned “wooden kente cloths” using humble pieces of pine, ebony, ash, maple, walnut, plywood, and other soft and hard woods. Ribeiro pulls inspiration from kente cloth and African-American quilting patterns as a way to bridge his own cultural background growing up between Ghana and the United States, using a personal artistic style that escapes mediation from Western language.

Resourcefulness and using repurposed materials are central to Ato Ribeiro, who recently graduated with an MFA in Printmaking from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Wooden scraps and chips discarded in Cranbrook’s wood shop struck the artist as a material treasure trove that resonated with his upbringing in West Africa, surrounded by rainforest woods and a tradition of woodworking. “I began to see these woods as a metaphor for individual bodies of people of African descent, and how these bodies had been treated or used in Western culture… My goal became to reveal the beauty that I saw in these discarded materials, and to get my audiences to slow down and recognize the same.” Combining woods ranging from pale pine to dark ebony, Ribeiro creates elaborate, geometric, mosaic-like patterns; yet he retains a direct communication with viewers through the material’s familiarity and the quilt-like nature of the large scale works. Site specificity is also central to the artist’s practice. Ribeiro researches the material and physical histories of each particular location where he works: Home Coming incorporate woods collected in Detroit as well as materials from historic Chicago landmarks, sourced from the Rebuild Exchange in Chicago.

Ato Ribeiro (b. 1989, Philadelphia) spent the formative years of his life in Accra, Ghana. He received his BA from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and MFA in Print Media from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Ribeiro has worked in a variety of media, including sculpture, installation, drawing, and print making. His work has been exhibited at the Nubuke Foundation (Accra, Ghana), ABSA Gallery (Johannesburg, South Africa), the Mercedez-Benz Financial Services Headquarters (Farmington Hills, Michigan), The Ink Shop (Ithaca, NY), Agnes Scott Dalton Gallery (Atlanta, Georgia), Crankbrook Art Museum (Bloomfield Hills, Michigan), The Carr Center (Detroit, Michigan), N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art (Detroit, Michigan), Anastasia Tinari Projects (Chicago, IL), and Lisa Sette Gallery (Phoenix, AZ - forthcoming). He was a 2017 Summer Fellow at the Ox-Bow School of Art in Saugatuck, Michigan and a 2017 Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Emerging Artist Award recipient and Artist in Residence at the Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, Germany. 

 

ZACHARY CAHILL: USSA SANCTUARY

September 9 - October 22, 2017

 

Anastasia Tinari Projects is honored to present Zachary Cahill: USSA Sanctuary, the artist’s first solo exhibition in the city since his 2014 show at Museum of Contemporary Art. First formulated in Chicago in 2009, Zachary Cahill’s long-term exhibition-based project “USSA” explores concepts of nation building. USSA posits that art does not have the power to change the worldit is the power to change the world. The USSA has taken the form of an Orphanage, followed by a Gift Shop, Wellness Center, a State Farm, and now a state-church dubbed the Assembly. USSA Sanctuary will present new paintings, sculpture, and a séance performance that will comprise the first full exhibition component of Cahill’s USSA Assembly in Chicago.

USSA Sanctuary is a meditation on repair and rescue through solidarity. Futuristic in its orientation, USSA Sanctuary proposes political possibilities through the valances of abstraction and fantasy. If we live in a world composed of alt-facts and fake news, then it follows that the imagination, the very cogwheels of art itself, is a site for socio-politico contestation. If the old gods are silent, implore new ones to sing. If humanities’ temples are in ruins, build a bright one that shines. If the cosmos is out alignment, draw new trajectories for the stars. If the house of trust has been broken, cast and fire new brick of faith. If the unity has been splintered, assemble. If you do not agree with this world, conjure a new one. Construct a sacred space. Make a sanctuary.

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Zachary Cahill is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist. He has had solo shows at Regina Rex, New York, the KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin, Threewalls, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His work has been included in group exhibitions including: the 8th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art (2014), The Works, Contemporary Art Brussels (2015), and “Broken Flag” Iceberg Projects, Chicago (2016), among others. A widely published author, Cahill's writing has appeared in Afterall, Artforum, The Exhibitionist, Frieze, and MousseArtReview recently profiled Zachary Cahill for its 2017 special issue The Future Greats, a selection of twelve artists from around the world that take on the complexity of the contemporary moment. He is Curator at the University of Chicago's Gray Center.

 

Installation images:

  

Automythography: Mequitta Ahuja, Kambui Olujimi, Kaveri Raina, Ato Ribeiro, Alex Yudzon

July 8 - August 30, 2017

 Kambui Olujimi, 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Kambui Olujimi, 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Aspect/Ratio, in conjunction with Anastasia Tinari Projects, is pleased to present RHAPSODY REFRACTED, the first Chicago solo exhibition for artist Kambui Olujimi. RHAPSODY REFRACTED is a new body of work by Brooklyn native Kambui Olujimi. The exhibition, which includes sculpture, drawing, and a video installation, explores the perpetual interruption and the subsequent refraction of black rhapsody.

The exhibition focuses on the final moments of the 89th Academy Awards in which the presenters failed to announce the movie Moonlight as the winner for the Best Picture Oscar. While the mistake was eventually reconciled on stage and broadcast on international television, the moment of recognition of the film and filmmaker’s historic achievements were marred irrevocably by this unprecedented blunder. This body of work is a proposition of time reconstituted--reimagined and reclaimed from the refracted fragments of stifled elation.

--

Kambui Olujimi is a New York based artist and Assistant Professor at Columbia University. His work reflects on mythology, historic narrative, media cultures amongst many themes and is manifested in installation, photography, performance, tapestry, video, large sculpture, works on paper and painting. Olujimi received his MFA from Columbia University and his work has been shown internationally. Recent exhibitions include: Mass MoCA, PS1 MoMA, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Institutional collections include: Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Nasher Museum and The Cleveland Art Museum. 

 Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

 Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung

Kambui Olujimi, "Fly Trap," 2017. Photo: Tek Chung


 

Burrow: Corinne Teed and Valentina Zamifrescu

June 3 - 30, 2017

ACRE
(1345 W 19th Street, Chicago, IL)

 Corinne Teed, The Burrows, 2016, Digital Video, Loop

Corinne Teed, The Burrows, 2016, Digital Video, Loop

ACRE is delighted to present the two-person exhibition Burrow, in which Valentina Zamifrescu and Corinne Teed use film, virtual reality, printmaking, and sculpture to create personal worlds that explore suppressed memories and forge a utopian queer ecology existence. Corinne Teed’s titular video piece The Burrows shows six diverse people curling up in and digging out large animal-like burrows in the brown soil. Working with fellow residents on ACRE’s Steuben, Wisconsin grounds, Teed filmed her subjects resting, dozing, and boring, their bodies conforming to and determining the hole’s womb like shape. Near the end, the film’s participants emerge from their burrows like small animals waking from hibernation. Teed interweaves queer, animal, and ecological dialogues to re-examine social and environmental histories. By drawing this parallel, she explores how queer and animal communities have been ostracized or isolated to serve late capitalist society.

Valentina Zamifrescu excavates and abstracts hew own suppressed memories and traumas from a childhood in Romania during Communism’s abolishment and her family’s subsequent immigration to the United States. In her Virtual Reality environment Retreat, viewers enter a digital space with snow and mountains and are free to move around and explore. Unlike other video and gaming experiences with a structured narrative and directed actions, Zamifrescu’s environment is a suspended dreamscape without any pointed direction. Viewers float within this world like distant memory; Retreat’s characters are removed, isolated, and refuse to interact. Zamifrescu’s accompanying sculptures and 2D works also cull her memories and unrecognized family experiences, exploring whether trauma can be suppressed or passed on. With artistic practices that stretch across disciplines, both Teed and Zamifrescu carve out a more inclusive, personal, and comforting space and place that is not provided or granted by social norms.

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Valentina Zamfirescu was born in Craiova, Romania in 1984 and relocated to the United States when she was 12 years old. Zamfirescu received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013 and she is currently pursuing her MFA at Yale University in the Sculpture Department. Valentina is a co-founder and co-director of 4th Ward Project Space, in Chicago, Illinois. She has shown in Chicago at institutions and galleries including Slow and the International Museum of Surgical Science.

Corinne Teed is a research-based, multimedia artist primarily working in printmaking, installation, time based media and social practice. Her research interests include queer theory, ecology, critical animal studies and settler colonialism. She has attended residencies at ACRE, Signal Fire, AS220 and Virginia Center for Creative Arts, while her work has been exhibited in the U.S. and abroad. Teed received a BA from Brown University and an MFA from University of Iowa.

Feeling Homesick At Home: NIC Kay, Grace Kubilius, Ato Ribiero, WORK/PLAY

April 7 - 28, 2017

ACRE
(1345 W 19th Street, Chicago, IL)

 WORK/PLAY, Our Allegiance, 2016, pigment silk-screened on cotton, painted grommets, 26 x 47 inches

WORK/PLAY, Our Allegiance, 2016, pigment silk-screened on cotton, painted grommets, 26 x 47 inches

ACRE Projects is pleased to announce Feeling Homesick At Home, an exhibition of new work by artists NIC Kay, Grace Kubilius, Ato Ribiero and WORK/PLAY

Feeling Homesick at Home: How does one cope when the very essence or foundations of home are questioned? Re-making an American flag in silkscreened black cloth; employing kente cloth and African-American quilting patterning; performing a cultural wake to Get Well Soon; or exploring female identity using the body and textile, the four artists in Feeling Homesick at Home articulate diverse identities within the complicated American experience. NIC Kay, Grace Kubilius, Ato Ribeiro, and WORK/PLAY use design, textile, sculpture, and performance to effectuate a more representative visual culture and national ritual, reverberating a disconnect between America’s contested reality and its ideals of equality and liberty.

In WORK/PLAY’s Our Allegiance, rich blue-black and purple-black kente cloth patterning replace the American flag’s red and white stripes. The St. Louis based collaborative reclaims and takes possession of our foundational national symbol through lovingly silk screening and sewing together strips of cloth, a meditation on freedom. In the artists’ words, “For many, [the flag] means freedom, but to blacks and many other people of color, it's a symbol of oppression.” Ghanaian-American artist Ato Ribeiro’s conceptual practice likewise incorporates kente cloth, as well as African-American quilt patterns, thereby bridging his West African heritage and African-American identity in Western culture. Ribeiro’s abstract wood panels are precisely pieced together from different shades of natural and repurposed wood and replicate embedded patterns and messages from African and African-American textiles. For instance, the Adinkra (visual symbols created by the Ashanti people of Ghana) symbol of Sankofa means “return and retrieve it”, which visually communicates the importance of the past.

Grace Kubilius’ grotesquely beautiful textile sculptures and wearable objects use the body as an absent armature to explore and rationalize female identity. Elevating the rough surfaces of stitched, folded, and rolled fabric materials, Kubilius’ textile piece in Feeling Homesick at Home serves as a stand-in for the body: limp, wrinkled, controlled and uncontrollable. In an accompanying video, we see the artist’s body undergoing touching, pinching, caressing, and slapping, from anonymous hands. NIC Kay’s strong, poetic movement and performance work engages the public with their contemporary African-American experience. The ongoing project Get Well Soon is a meditation on the cultural trope as it applies to the current social-political landscape. For ACRE, NIC Kay takes an excerpt, titled Shawaam / Dip / Death Drop, and extends the performance practice into an exhibition context. After Nic Kay’s performance of a slow, dramatic drop, a stage set will remain as a shell for the artist’s body. Together, the artists in Feeling Homesick at Home create dialogue around the complications and alienation of African-American and female identity in the contemporary American landscape, echoing a nationwide nostalgia for an America that has yet to be realized.

The Particular Poetics of Things: Nazafarin Lotfi, Rana Siegel, Tina Tahir, and Neha Vedpathak

November 13 - December 17, 2016

GOLDFINCH
(319 N. Albany Avenue, Chicago, IL)

 Installation view,  The Particular Poetics of Things

Installation view, The Particular Poetics of Things

GOLDFINCH is pleased to present a group exhibition of works by four artists whose site-responsive practices balance an architectural command of space, form, and material with an abiding interest in surface description and the passage of time. Utilizing highly personal and intuitive approaches to a post-Minimalist vocabulary, each of these artists transforms mundane materials into strikingly poetic visual forms. The exhibition is curated by Anastasia Karpova Tinari.

Rana Siegel’s “ice works” compactly illustrate the interest in temporality, transience and fragility shared by all four artists. Consisting of elegantly looped strips of ribbon or fabric held in place by blocks of ice, Siegel’s small-scale sculptures will slowly dissolve and transform over the course of the gallery’s initial open hours. After the ice melts, the fabric strips will remain, their placement in space no longer supported by a frozen armature but instead determined solely by the forces of gravity and dissolving liquid.

Alchemical transformation of everyday materials is also central to the art of Nazafarin Lotfi, who constructs richly-layered abstract works from newspaper, cardboard, or cast-off items. Intimately-scaled and absent of specific narrative points of reference, her sculptures’ muted palettes and time-worn textures speak instead to the ways in which history and memory accumulate and/or inscribe themselves upon the surface of things over time.

Temporal metamorphosis is likewise enacted in–and activated through—Tina Tahir’s floor piece, which is composed of fragrant spices and brightly colored pigment laid out in decorative patterns like an Oriental rug. Drawing her audience in with ornamental seduction, Tahir lays out designs based on opium poppies and armament graphics meant to suggest socio-political subtexts that have fragmented the Middle East and led to its exploitation by the West. As in all of Tahir’s installations, the audience will eventually be invited to walk on the floor piece, physically dispersing and muddying its rich surface decoration.

The “plucked paper” that Neha Vedpathak uses to sculpt her architectonic works is a delicately textured, lace-like material the artist creates herself by separating the fibers of hand-made Japanese paper. This labor-intensive, meditative technique is central to Vedpathak’s practice of intuitively responding to organic materials like paper, stone, and earth. For this exhibition, Vedpathak has created a site-specific intervention that mirrors and disrupts Goldfinch’s architectural environment in ways that highlight the raw yet refined nature of the gallery space.